You are here

News of States - the latest news from all the states

FROM THE FIELD: ‘Harvested’ rainwater saves Tanzanian students from stomach ulcers, typhoid

The students in the Tanzanian town of Bagamoyo once had to decide between getting sick or being thirsty all day long.

Press Releases: Kosovo National Day

Press Statement Michael R. Pompeo
Secretary of State Washington, DC
February 17, 2019

On behalf of the United States government and the American people, I congratulate Kosovo as you celebrate your eleventh anniversary as a sovereign, independent nation.

The United States remains committed to helping Kosovo open the doors to a more prosperous, stable, and secure future in your second decade of independence. Comprehensive normalization of relations with Serbia, with mutual recognition as its centerpiece, will be essential to Kosovo’s success. Securing this vision also demands continued strides to strengthen your democratic institutions. We want to keep building on our bilateral partnership, based on shared values and priorities, helping Kosovo pave its way to further Western integration.

The United States values the strong bond between our people and will support the steps of those working to unleash Kosovo’s great potential.

 


The Office of Website Management, Bureau of Public Affairs, manages this site as a portal for information from the U.S. State Department.
External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views or privacy policies contained therein.

In West Africa, UN Security Council visits Côte d'Ivoire and Guinea-Bissau

Members of the United Nations Security Council are on a mission to West Africa where they are reviewing strides made in peacebuilding by both Côte d'Ivoire and Guinea-Bissau.

Press Releases: On Heather Nauert's Consideration for the Nomination for U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations

Press Statement Robert Palladino
Deputy Spokesperson Washington, DC
February 16, 2019

Today Heather Nauert withdrew herself from consideration for the nomination of U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. The President will make an announcement with respect to a nominee for U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations soon.

Spokesperson Heather Nauert: “I am grateful to President Trump and Secretary Pompeo for the trust they placed in me for considering me for the position of U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. However, the past two months have been grueling for my family and therefore it is in the best interest of my family that I withdraw my name from consideration. Serving in the Administration for the past two years has been one of the highest honors of my life and I will always be grateful to the President, the Secretary, and my colleagues at the State Department for their support.”

Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo: “Heather Nauert has performed her duties as a senior member of my team with unequalled excellence. Her personal decision today to withdraw her name from consideration to become the nominee for United States Ambassador to the United Nations is a decision for which I have great respect. I wish Heather nothing but the best in all of her future endeavors and know that she will continue to be a great representative of this nation in whatever role she finds herself.”


The Office of Website Management, Bureau of Public Affairs, manages this site as a portal for information from the U.S. State Department.
External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views or privacy policies contained therein.

Press Releases: Lithuania National Day

Press Statement Michael R. Pompeo
Secretary of State Washington, DC
February 16, 2019

On behalf of the people of the United States and our government, I wish to congratulate all Lithuanians on the 101st anniversary of restoration of your independence. Sveikiname!

Together, over the course of the past year, we have celebrated your centennial anniversary and all that you have achieved since your declaration of independence in 1918. We were proud to host President Grybauskaite at the White House in April 2018, along with the presidents of Estonia and Latvia, for the U.S.-Baltic Centennial Summit and the U.S. Baltic Business Forum. In honor of the Baltic centennial anniversaries, we also hosted over 100 youth from across the region to the United States on U.S. government exchange programs.

Throughout 2018, we amplified our close partnership as Allies, including through major NATO exercises like Saber Strike and BALTOPS in June 2018. We commend and thank Lithuania for its significant contributions to security and stability in the region and beyond, including in Afghanistan and Iraq, and note that Lithuania is already dedicating two percent of its GDP on defense spending. In 2019, Lithuania will celebrate the 15th anniversary of its accession to NATO and we are grateful to have such a steadfast Ally.

In 2019, we commemorate 30 years since the 1989 revolutions including the fall of the Berlin Wall and democratic milestones like the Baltic Way, which ushered in an era of unprecedented freedom and prosperity for the region and for our transatlantic community. The United States is proud to partner with Lithuania in that community. May the next 101 years continue to deepen the strong ties between the United States and Lithuania.


The Office of Website Management, Bureau of Public Affairs, manages this site as a portal for information from the U.S. State Department.
External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views or privacy policies contained therein.

FROM THE FIELD: Survival in Yemen against all odds

Fawaz, just 18-months old, suffered from severe acute malnutrition and was on the brink of death. In war-torn Yemen, he was one of hundreds of thousands of children, more likely to die, than survive.

‘Maintain calm’ and ‘exercise patience’ UN envoy urges, as Nigeria heads to polls

As Nigerians get ready to head to the polls on Saturday, the Head of the UN Office for West Africa and the Sahel (UNOWAS), described the pre-election period as “largely, peaceful and participatory”, and called for that spirit to prevail through election day and beyond.

Country origin ‘best predictor of outcome’ for children with cancer, UN experts say

Each year, an estimated 215 000 cancers are diagnosed in children under-15, and about 85 000 cancers in those aged 15–19 years, the cancer research agency of the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Thursday.

Press Releases: The United States Delivers Additional Humanitarian Assistance in Cucuta, Colombia for the People of Venezuela

Press Statement Robert Palladino
Deputy Spokesperson Washington, DC
February 15, 2019

The United States is responding to Interim President Juan Guaido’s request to help meet the urgent needs of the people of Venezuela. On February 16, the Department of State, USAID, and the Department of Defense, in a cooperative effort, will deliver aid ready for distribution within Venezuela to Cucuta, Colombia.

This whole-of-government response is a demonstration of the U.S. commitment to the Venezuelan people.

Department of State and USAID officials will join the flight of humanitarian assistance leaving Miami on February 16. In Cucuta, USAID, U.S. Department of State, Colombian officials, and representatives of Venezuelan Interim President Guaido will welcome the supplies to augment aid already pre-positioned at Interim President Guaido’s first international humanitarian assistance center. Working in close coordination with the Government of Colombia and President Guaido’s representatives, this assistance will address the greatest needs for the most vulnerable populations in Venezuela.

This humanitarian mission underscores the United States’ firm commitment and readiness to respond to the man-made political, economic, and humanitarian crisis in Venezuela. This humanitarian assistance must be allowed to enter Venezuela to reach people in need.

Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs Julie Chung will represent the U.S. Department of State.


The Office of Website Management, Bureau of Public Affairs, manages this site as a portal for information from the U.S. State Department.
External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views or privacy policies contained therein.

Press Releases: Press Availability With Icelandic Foreign Minister Gudlaugur Thor Thordarson

Press Availability Michael R. Pompeo
Secretary of State Harpa Concert Hall
Reykjavik, Iceland
February 15, 2019

MODERATOR: Ladies and gentlemen, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Iceland Gudlaugur Thor Thordarson, and Secretary of State – Secretary of State of the United States of America Mr. Mike Pompeo.

Minister Thordarson, please.

FOREIGN MINISTER THORDARSON: Thank you. Good afternoon, everybody, and thank you for coming to this press conference on the occasion of the visit of U.S. Secretary of State Michael Pompeo. Welcome.

Iceland and the United States have for decades enjoyed a very close relationship, a true friendship. Seventy-five years ago, in 1944, the United States was the first country to recognize the Republic of Iceland, which meant a lot during times of war, and we are still grateful. In fact, the United States entered the front line of World War II in Iceland six months prior to Pearl Harbor. Our countries are bound together by common heritage, but also principles and values, which continue to be tested as we talk together to face different regional and global threats, values that we need to uphold and protect.

The ocean also connects us, and today we discussed our continued good cooperation in the Arctic, as Iceland assumes the chairmanship of the Arctic Council in May. The sustainable development on ocean affairs (inaudible). As geographic changes in the high north of the Arctic becomes more accessible through alternative transportation routes, we need to enhance our cooperation even further – for example, in fields like search and rescue.

Iceland and the United States share strategic interests, and today we talked about the upcoming NATO ministerial meeting in Washington in April, where we will celebrate 70 years of successful transatlantic cooperation. Our bilateral defense cooperation, which is based on our 1951 defense agreement, also stands on strong footing and continues to play both a security (inaudible). The decades-long presence of U.S. Armed Forces in Iceland left a lasting cultural legacy. People sometimes ask me if Iceland is a European state. I guess the academic answer is yes, but when you really think about it, we literally belong to Europe and North America as the continental divide runs straight through our country, and I believe that this continental divide is reflected in the nation’s heart and soul. We are more American than other Europeans.

In a sense, we are a transatlantic nation, which brings me to trade and our people-to-people connections. The United States is Iceland’s largest bilateral trading partner. The U.S. travelers are the single largest group of visitors to Iceland. Last year, some 700,000 U.S. tourists visited Iceland, or twice the size of our population, reflecting the relationship and frequent-flier connections between our countries.

There is, however, still unrealized potential for trade in our commercial relationship, and today we decided to establish an economic dialogue between Iceland and the United States to advance our bilateral economic cooperation further. The economic dialogue will include bilateral discussions between government officials, but also private sector, with the goal of boosting bilateral trade, investment, and importantly, private sector ties.

Mr. Secretary, dear Mike, thank you for a fruitful meeting and visiting Iceland. I look forward to the continued cooperation and friendship between Iceland and the United States.

SECRETARY POMPEO: Thank you very much. Good afternoon, everyone. I want to thank Prime Minister Jakobsdottir and Foreign Minister Thordarson for hosting me today. I greatly appreciate it. It was a great working lunch. We had a wonderful conversation. We recounted some of the remarkable history between our two countries, and I look forward to seeing the prime minister here in just a little bit. It’s the first time I’ve had the opportunity to come to Iceland, but it feels very familiar. Many of you won’t know this, but before my time in government service, I founded a small business in Kansas, so I have a special appreciation for entrepreneurs and people like those here, and for people who strive to be, as Icelanders like to say, best i heimi. Our two nations do share just a wonderful and important history, and our people should never forget that. Your explorers ventured across the centuries before we were even a country. Now tens of thousands of more – our adventurous tourists love to come here and visit. I saw them on my drive in. The flow of people is now going the other way; we’re coming here.

During World War II, this nation granted our American convoys aid to help Britain access to your ports, and our Apollo astronauts trained here. We’re proud to be the first country that recognized Iceland diplomatically, now 75 years ago. I congratulate you on 75 years of full independence. As a founding member of NATO, Iceland makes important contributions. We were delighted you hosted the successful first phase of the Trident Juncture exercise this past fall in October, and we certainly appreciate the key role that you play in securing sea lines of communications both between Europe and North America.

And the economic relationship between our two countries remains strong. We definitely hope we can make it stronger. The United States recently became Iceland’s largest single trading partner, and as you’d spoken about, we have now established an economic dialogue between our two nations which I think will bear fruit quickly next year but in the years and decades ahead as well. It will strengthen the bilateral ties between our two countries by connecting government and private sector stakeholders from both countries.

There will always be challenges. We can’t take any aspect of our relationship for granted. There hasn’t been a U.S. secretary of state come here since 2008. I just spent four days in Central and Eastern Europe visiting capitals that had been neglected under the prior administration as well. No more. No more will we take our friends, our true allies, our partners for granted. We simply can’t afford to neglect them. Our economies are too closely tied.

We also seek a real partnership with you on the Arctic, a region that is increasingly strategically important, and we look forward to working with you on Arctic issues as you assume the chairmanship of the Arctic Council this coming May.

We know that when America retreats, nations like China and Russia will fill the vacuum. It’s inevitable if we are not there. In 1986, you hosted the pivotal summit between President Reagan and General Secretary Gorbachev that was the beginning of the end of the Soviet Union. Today we remain proud to stand shoulder to shoulder with Iceland in a strong transatlantic community that we have now built. We’re old friends facing new challenges, and I am confident we’ll tackle them together. And I’m delighted to be here too and to take questions. Thank you.

MODERATOR: Thank you very much. Now we have time for two questions from the journalists, one from an Icelandic reporter and another from traveling press. The first question goes to Stefan Rafn Sigurbjoernsson from Channel 2 News, Stod 2, in Iceland. Stefan, please.

QUESTION: Thank you. Welcome to Iceland, Mr. Secretary.

SECRETARY POMPEO: Thank you.

QUESTION: My question is for both the Secretary and the minister. It’s about Icelandic-U.S. relations in terms of trade and defense. Could you please elaborate further on the economic dialogue and what it means for the future? Is this a first step toward something like a free trade partnership? Do you see any obstacles like EU regulations, for example, if that were a possibility in the future? And in terms of security, how do you see U.S. role in the Arctic with the ever-increasing military presence of Russia in the region? Do you see a more active role including Iceland? Do you see more military deployment or maybe reopening of bases? Thank you.

SECRETARY POMPEO: So, if I may – may I tackle it first?

FOREIGN MINISTER THORDARSON: Yeah.

SECRETARY POMPEO: First with respect to the economic dialogues, we think they’re important for multiple reasons. The first is it is always important to get private sector actors talking to each other to educate them about opportunities there are to trade with other nations. And so that will be a central part of what we try to accomplish, making sure that American businesses understand the opportunities that exist here and companies from this country seeing markets and opportunities in the United States as well.

But second, and you mentioned this, we think also that better understanding puts us in a better place to come to even more cooperative trade relations between our two countries. And whether they’ll ultimately be fulfilled through a formal trade agreement – which, if we can accomplish, would be a really good outcome – or whether they simply come from a set of common understandings where we reduce cost, reduce friction, reduce barriers to entry for our companies to work inside the other countries, that will be a good thing as well.

As for the security issues, the United States deeply understands the strategic – geostrategic challenges that exist in the Arctic, the risks that are there. And we’ve watched America’s adversaries begin to deploy assets in a way that they believe will strategically disadvantage not only the United States but Iceland and the European countries as well.

And so what the form of that effort will take I think remains to be determined, but I am very confident that America and Iceland working together will achieve outcomes. And I look forward to being part of this as Iceland takes over the Arctic Council of determining how and where best to deploy assets – not simply military assets but all of the assets, the enormous advantages that we have by being democracies, rule-of-law countries, all of the things that have made us strong for all these years – to ensure that the Arctic doesn’t become a threat to those very values.

FOREIGN MINISTER THORDARSON: Thank you. First, when you talk about trade relations, of course they are good, but we can always, always improve. And I think that we take the best things when it comes to the European cooperation. We are part of EEA and being part of EEA means that we are not a part of the customs union. So it means that we can make a free trade deal with every nations or which we want, and we have done so.

We also look at free trade as a very important thing and want to look in a constructive way, but you were mentioning the technical barriers, which is, of course, a threat to free trade. But we – I think we need to look into it in a constructive way. We are a pure example – Iceland – of the importance of free trade. We are probably one of the poorest nations in Western Europe a hundred years ago. Now we are one of the richest.

The reason – one of the reasons – and we would never be where we are if we wouldn’t have access to other markets and our markets wouldn’t be open. So that’s the basic idea, and I am very pleased that we have today the words of the Secretary and also that we are excited to take this important step. And I think it’s right that we should try to do it as quickly as possible because, at the end, it’s a really – it’s a rather simple thing if you have – if you look at it in a constructive way. But I think it’s important that we start the dialogue, we start the work, and then we will see the outcome. But of course, we would like to see closer trade relations with the U.S., and a free trade deal, of course, is something that we are looking for.

When it comes to the Arctic and the security and defense, that we have a very clear strategy – Iceland – when it comes to the Arctic. We want to see it sustainable not only when it comes to the environment but also economically and socially. There are 4 million people who live in the Arctic, and we have to think about their needs and their will when it comes to the area. And also it’s very important that we see Arctic in the near and distant future as a peaceful, low-tension area. So that’s what we are aiming for, that’s what we will be discussing, and that’s what we will work with the U.S. and other partners to see that it will happen.

And also, because you mentioned Russia, that’s another among the nations that we have worked very closely together on when it comes to the Arctic. And Arctic has been so far, and hopefully in the near and distant future, an area which every partner who are involved, especially in the Arctic Council, agree on the importance of seeing the Arctic as a low-tension, peaceful area where you have the rule of law. And long may it continue, and we will do everything we can to achieve that.

MODERATOR: Thank you. Another question from the international media. Lesley Wroughton from Reuters, please.

QUESTION: Good afternoon, or is it afternoon? I can’t remember. Just to get to some news of the day, please, Mr. Secretary, Venezuela’s Maduro has invited Elliott Abrams, the special envoy, to Caracas for talks. Do you think this is a signal to the U.S. that he is looking for a way out? And will you, in fact, send Special Envoy Abrams to Caracas? First question.

The second one is: You spoke earlier about increased presence of China and Russia in the Arctic region. How does the U.S. hope to counter that? And also, what does the U.S. hope to gain from being back in operation at the airbase, the Reykjavik airbase? Why is it important to the U.S. and to Iceland to have a U.S. presence there?

SECRETARY POMPEO: As for Venezuela, Lesley, you’ve traveled with me before. You’re asking me to comment on something we’re going to do in the future, and I have steadfastly and consistently refused to tell anyone what our strategy is with respect to achieving our end-state goal for Venezuela, which is getting the outcome for the Venezuelan people that they so richly deserve, while this man, Maduro, has created a humanitarian crisis that is unequaled in a nation where there was no armed conflict. And we as soon as this weekend will continue to deliver massive humanitarian assistance. We hope that Mr. Maduro will allow that into his country.

The fact that he has publicly said he wants to talk with the United States is not new, but I think it demonstrates his increasing understanding that the Venezuelan people are rejecting him and his model of governance and that the interim president, Mr. Guaido, is both constitutionally the leader of that country and, importantly, will lead Venezuela and the Venezuelan people towards free and fair elections which will determine a way forward for Venezuela which will put the Venezuelan people in a much better place and on a path towards economic recovery that they so richly deserve.

Your second question about how do you counter China and Russia, one of the first things you do is you find friends and allies who are in the region, and you work alongside them, and you show up, and you have serious discussions with them about how best to approach it. We have laid out in the National Security Strategy how the United States thinks about it during this administration, and there are multiple elements to it, not the least of which is working with our allies inside of the Arctic Council to develop precisely the right strategy so that, as the foreign minister said, a peaceful, low-tension environment exists. And we’re prepared to devote American resources to achieving that.

And then your third question was about the American presence. We welcome the invitation to be here to do what is important work that our military is doing here. It is aimed squarely at the very mission that your previous question referred to, ensuring that safe transit, open rule-of-law of waterways continue to exist in this very important, very central, geostrategically central location that I’m standing in today.

FOREIGN MINISTER THORDARSON: Well, thank you. When it comes to Venezuela, then you all know about the situation. I think what we are hoping – and I think it’s very good that like-minded nations have put pressure on Maduro to hold democratic elections, which, of course, is very important. I think I don’t need to describe to Mr. Secretary (inaudible) a few years – a few words about the situation. This is, of course, really, really serious, and I hope that this is a sign of good things, but to be honest, I don’t know.

When it comes to bilateral relations on defense and security and our membership in NATO, it’s always the same – or same aim: We want to see peace, especially in this part of the world, and of course, in the world as a whole. That’s the reason we joined NATO in the first place. That’s the reason we made the bilateral agreement between us and the U.S. And lower tension means that we don’t need to do as much, but unfortunately, things have changed a bit since 2014, as we all know, and – but we will hope that we will see change in another direction in the future. But as we speak, then the situation is as it is.

MODERATOR: Thank you very much, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Minister Thordarson. I would also like to thank you all for your questions.


The Office of Website Management, Bureau of Public Affairs, manages this site as a portal for information from the U.S. State Department.
External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views or privacy policies contained therein.

UN and partners appeal for $920 million to meet ‘dire needs’ of Rohingya refugees

With more than 745,000 Rohingya having fled violence in Myanmar to settle in Bangladesh, joining roughly 200,000 others already sheltering there, United Nations aid agencies and partners launched an appeal on Friday to help meet their “dire needs".

Biggest ever UN aid delivery in Syria provides relief to desperate civilians

The biggest UN humanitarian convoy yet to operate inside Syria has successfully distributed aid to 40,000 desperate people in a hard-to-access desert camp near the country’s southern border with Jordan, the Organization announced on Friday.

Press Releases: Secretary Pompeo's Meeting With Icelandic Prime Minister Katrin Jakobsdottir

Readout Office of the Spokesperson Washington, DC
February 15, 2019

The below is attributable to Deputy Spokesperson Robert Palladino:‎

Secretary Michael R. Pompeo visited Reykjavik today, marking the first official visit by a U.S. Secretary of State to Iceland since 2008. Secretary Pompeo met with Prime Minister Katrin Jakobsdottir and they discussed Iceland’s upcoming chairmanship of the Arctic Council, regional security concerns, energy innovation, and nuclear proliferation. Secretary Pompeo expressed his desire to deepen the United States-Iceland partnership, and noted that the United States is proud to stand shoulder to shoulder with Iceland in the strong transatlantic community that has supported the spread of freedom and prosperity across Europe.


The Office of Website Management, Bureau of Public Affairs, manages this site as a portal for information from the U.S. State Department.
External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views or privacy policies contained therein.

Press Releases: Secretary Pompeo's Calls With Nigerian Presidential Candidates President Muhammadu Buhari and Former Vice President Atiku Abubakar

Readout Office of the Spokesperson Washington, DC
February 15, 2019

The below is attributable to Deputy Spokesperson Robert Palladino:‎

Secretary Michael R. Pompeo spoke with major Nigerian presidential candidates President Muhammadu Buhari and former Vice President Atiku Abubakar in advance of the country’s February 16 presidential election. The Secretary noted the deep and long-standing partnership between the United States and Nigeria, Africa’s most-populous democracy and largest economy. He underscored U.S. support for the Nigerian goal of free, fair, transparent, and peaceful elections that reflect the will of the Nigerian people. He welcomed both candidates’ signing of a peace pledge and public commitment to renounce violence and to accept the results of a credible process. The Secretary noted the conduct of the elections is critical for the future of democracy in Nigeria and across Africa.


The Office of Website Management, Bureau of Public Affairs, manages this site as a portal for information from the U.S. State Department.
External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views or privacy policies contained therein.

Press Releases: Secretary Pompeo's Travel to Iceland

Fact Sheet Office of the Spokesperson Washington, DC
February 15, 2019

  • The United States was the first country to recognize Iceland’s independence in 1944. Over the past 75 years, the United States has developed a close relationship built on our strong defense cooperation, growing trade and investment, and people-to-people ties.

PARTNERS IN SECURITY

  • Under the 1951 Defense Agreement, the United States is committed to Iceland’s defense, a commitment that is sacrosanct. In 2016, our governments signed a Joint Declaration reaffirming our commitment and partnership.
  • Iceland’s Keflavik Air Base supports U.S. and NATO operations in the North Atlantic and provides critical maritime and aerial domain awareness. The Icelandic Coast Guard operates Keflavik and undertakes crucial Search and Rescue operations in the Arctic.
  • Iceland is a founding member of NATO, and together the United States and Iceland support pressing global priorities, including the Resolute Support Mission in Afghanistan and the Coalition to Defeat ISIS.

PARTNERS IN ECONOMIC PROSPERITY

  • The United States recently became Iceland’s largest single trading partner, and our overall trade in 2017 topped $800 million.
  • Many U.S. brands and franchises have thrived in Iceland, including Costco, Hard Rock Café, KFC/Taco Bell, and Domino's. U.S.-based Carpenter & Company is currently constructing the first 5-star hotel in Reykjavik, which will be operated by Marriott.

PARTNERS IN VALUES AND PEOPLE-TO-PEOPLE TIES

  • In 2018, 694,814 U.S. tourists visited Iceland, the largest group of foreign tourists to visit the island.
  • The United States and Iceland maintain close ties in education and scientific research. In 2018, more than 400 Icelanders studied in the United States. Each year a collaboration between the U.S. Fulbright Program and the National Science Foundation sends up to 10 American researchers to Iceland to conduct research on Arctic-focused topics.
  • The United States and Iceland enjoy a rich history of supporting freedom and democratic values. In 1986 during the height of the Cold War, Iceland hosted the historic summit meeting between President Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev.


The Office of Website Management, Bureau of Public Affairs, manages this site as a portal for information from the U.S. State Department.
External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views or privacy policies contained therein.

Two States ‘side-by-side’ is the ‘peaceful and just solution’ for Israel-Palestine conflict: Guterres

A “peaceful and just solution” to the Israel-Palestine conflict can “only be achieved” through two States “living side-by-side in peace and security”, United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres reiterated on Friday

Press Releases: U.S. Sanctions on Venezuelan Individuals and Entities

Press Statement Robert Palladino
Deputy Spokesperson Washington, DC
February 15, 2019

The United States remains steadfast in its support of Venezuelan Interim President Juan Guaido, the transitional government, and the Venezuelan people. We will continue to use the full weight of U.S. economic and diplomatic power to press for the restoration of Venezuelan democracy.

Today, the United States took action to continue to hold corrupt officials of the former illegitimate Maduro regime accountable by imposing sanctions on five current or former officials of the illegitimate Maduro regime. The corrupt officials include individuals of the Cuban-sponsored Venezuelan intelligence forces (SEBIN), the military counter-intelligence (DGCIM) unit, and the brutal special actions force (FAES). Additionally, the United States is taking action against the current President of Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A. (PdVSA).

These actions are in addition to the visa restrictions and revocations announced February 7 on members of the illegitimate Constituent Assembly, which usurped many of the constitutional powers of the legitimate National Assembly, and in addition to the visa restrictions and revocations announced on February 13 on members of the illegitimate Supreme Court, for undermining Venezuela’s democracy.

While the United States is holding certain officials responsible for their actions repressing the Venezuelan people and subverting their democracy, we reiterate our calls for the recognition of Juan Guaido as Interim President and call on all Venezuelan officials, including military and security forces, to help return Venezuela to the democratic country its citizens demand and deserve.

U.S. sanctions need not be permanent; they are intended to change behavior. The United States will continue to take appropriate action to respond to the situation in Venezuela as it develops.

For further information, the Department of Treasury’s press release can be found here.


The Office of Website Management, Bureau of Public Affairs, manages this site as a portal for information from the U.S. State Department.
External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views or privacy policies contained therein.

The changing face of Congress in 6 charts

Apart from its political makeup and policy objectives, the new Congress differs from prior ones in other ways, including its demographics.

The post The changing face of Congress in 6 charts appeared first on Pew Research Center.

Press Releases: Serbia National Day

Press Statement Michael R. Pompeo
Secretary of State Washington, DC
February 15, 2019

On behalf of the United States government and the American people, I am pleased to extend our congratulations to the people of Serbia as you celebrate your national day.

The United States remains committed to supporting Serbia’s goal of further Western integration. Normalizing relations with Kosovo, with mutual recognition as its foundation, is essential to the pursuit of this goal. It will take courage and leadership to unlock stability and prosperity for Serbia for generations to come and ensure your country realizes its full potential.

On your national day, we reflect on our historically strong friendship and look ahead to building an even deeper bilateral relationship between our countries.

 


The Office of Website Management, Bureau of Public Affairs, manages this site as a portal for information from the U.S. State Department.
External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views or privacy policies contained therein.

‘Endemic’ sexual violence surging in South Sudan: UN human rights office

A surge in sexual violence in South Sudan’s Unity state targeting victims as young as eight years old, has prompted a call from the UN human rights office, OHCHR, for urgent Government measures to protect victims, and bring perpetrators to justice.

Pages

For sale

You can buy the domain frontbusiness.com. All information under domaineverist.com

Translate


Members login

Publications, professional articles, contributions publish for members
login

If you are not a member yet, you need to register
register

LinkExchange

LinkExchange by Front Business

Web App´s

FirefoxInternet Explorer
ThunderbirdWWW Consortium (W3C)

Terms of Use - Disclaimer - Imprint - Contact - Copyright by HEADLINES FRONT BUSINESS 2012